The Barry Collapsible Drumset

The Barry Collapsible Drumset

1096bThe collapsible drumset was designed and produced by the Barry DrumA hollow cylindrical shellThe cylindrical body of the drum, usually made from plywood. of any size that has a head stretched over one or both ends and is b... More Manufacturing Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the early part of the century. Recommended for use by traveling drummers in dance bands and vaudeville orchestras, the set is highly portable. The bass drumThe lowest pitched drum in a marching band or with a drum setA set of drums consisting of generally 4 to 5 drums or more, and used in many different musical... More . A two-headed drum, it is usually... More and its calfskin heads fold up so that they fit inside the elliptical case with the snare drumOne of the more common drums in marching bands and drumlines and the primary drum of a drum set... More .

The Barry Drum Company relied almost solely on its patented collapsible drumset. In addition to its unique portability, it was also the first calf-head bass drum to do away with the flesh hoopThe round metal or wooden disc that holds the drumhead onto the drum. Lug casings are then fast... More . Instead, the head is secured to the rimThe metal hoop that keeps the drumhead in place. It fastens down onto the drumhead by screws (o... More by means of a screw-tightened metal band that fits in a recessed grooveA term among other drum terms used to describe the way a beat feels when it not only has a stea... More in the rim, allowing for easy replacement of heads. The drums were made in three sizes – 26″, 28″ and 30″. According to the company’s advertising, the drums were “light in weight, perfect in tone, durable in construction, beautiful in design, and simple in operation. You can set the drum up in three minutes and take it apart in less than one.”

The set in the PASThe Percussive Arts Society is a music service organization whose mission is to inspire, educa... Museum was built in 1919 and donated by George Lockett, Jr. and his family. Many of the ‘traps’ included with this set were marketed by the Barry Drum Company; however, George Jr.’s son, Jim Lockett, says: ‘When jukeboxes and movies with sound became popular, the old player pianos were often left on the streets to be picked up by the garbage men. I remember being told that Dad and his brother collected some of that from those old, broken-down player pianos and from a movie theater where they had been used for sound effects for silent films.’